Top Fitness Myths Busted

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Working out at the gym can be pretty scary when you are surrounded by lean people showing off their muscles and boasting about that certain hack they can swear by. If you are at the gym and you see another person doing something completely different to what you have been told, don’t just follow blindly. They might be doing something that is best for their body, but not for yours.

When it comes to fitness and getting in shape, you are bound to hear things that people live by. What if we told you that most of the hacks are actually myths and people have been doing it for years without any positive outcome? If you need someone to talk to then get in touch with a qualified trainer who can guide you better; unless you’re concerns are mental… ther an online psychologist might be the best option as mentioned here: https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/psychologyists/are-online-psychologists-for-real/. Otherwise, here is a list of fitness myths that we have compiled for you to help with your physical concerns.

 

  1. Spot Reduction

If you are trying to lose weight around your belly then just sit-ups won’t work. If your required area is covered with fat, the muscle won’t show up no matter the exercises. The best way to lose weight around the specific area is by consistently doing cardiovascular exercises along with a healthy diet. Once the fat layers are gone, then certain exercises can start showing muscles.

 

  1. There are three ab layers
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The myth revolving around the infamous 6 pack abs is that you have three layers – lower, upper and middle. However, the truth is that it’s all a single muscle. In order for you to target your ab muscle effectively, you need to pre-exhaust certain parts starting from top to bottom.

 

  1. Deep squats lead to knee pain

Many people say that deep squats aren’t good for your knees. However, there isn’t much truth to it as there isn’t enough evidence. The key is to keep your weight to a minimum, so try touching your heels with your butt while keeping the weight light. If you are using the right technique, this exercise won’t hurt.

 

  1. Deadlift is equal to back problems

You must have heard that certain people hurt their backs while doing a deadlift, but let us tell you that wasn’t because they did a deadlift. The reason behind this problem was compromised technique. Compromising your form may allow you to lift the weight but it messes up your back in the long run. It is better that you use the proper techniques.

 

  1. Heavy protein intake is important after lifting

Unless you are training to be a heavyweight lifter, loading up on proteins right after you lift isn’t going to help you. It’s probably going to hang in there or just sit on your waistline because a human body can only digest up to 15g of protein. The rest is just extra.

 

  1. Your wrists should be bent or cocked back while benching

The truth is that you should bench with your wrists straight. The biggest concern of benching this way is wrist tendonitis. It creates disruption in the proprioceptive system. Although it is difficult at the beginning, with time and practice your wrists get stronger, improving your neurological stiffening patterns.

 

  1. Long runs are for everyone

If you believe that anyone can achieve the long run milestone then you are mistaken. In order for you to run the extra miles, you need to be in running shape. You have to start your way from the ground up, which means starting with a light jog, running and then improving your stamina with time.

 

  1. Stretching decreases injuries
Source: bodybuilding.com

 

This is a common myth that every other person believes. At all cost, you should avoid static stretching before your regular exercise routine. You want your muscles to get active, not lazy. Keep the stretching for later maybe. They are a great way to relax your muscles post-exercise.

These are the most common myths that circulate the fitness world.…

What Is The Best Time To Work Out

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Doing a short exercise routine every day can have a range of benefits. It gets your heart rate going, lifts your mood and gets you ready to face the rest of the day. In reference to what some mental health experts say, there many different types of counseling (even if it’s free) that recommend physical activity, many of which are linked to reducing depression, stress, and illness.

In the end, the question isn’t whether or not exercise is good for you. It’s what time is it best for you to do it?

 

Is There A ‘Best Time’ To Work Out?

To consider the ‘best’ time to work out it’s important to see when physical activity reaps the most benefits.

Time can be subjective, as suggested by Russell Pate, a professor of ‘exercise science’ at the University of Carolina. He believes that the best time is when you will be most consistent with your exercise.

Accordingly, you may decide to consider your schedule and pick a time when you are free every day. This would mean breaking up your physical activity into 30-minute sessions every day. This is based on the recommendations made by the American Heart Association which suggested that a person needs between 75 to 150 minutes of exercise a week. The length of time in this recommendation is dependent on the type of exercise you do.

Aldana, the author of ‘the Stop and Go’ guide, believes that you should change your exercise routine, depending on the time of day. This is very important advice that you should consider carefully. What exercise are you doing, and what effects will it have on your body?

 

Considering Your Body

Everyone has a ‘body clock’. This is where the distinction between an ‘early bird’ and a ‘night owl’ comes in.

When considering your inner clock, or circadian rhythm, it’s important to see when you are most active and plan your exercise schedule accordingly. This is important because your body’s rhythm affects your blood pressure, heart rate, hormone levels, and body temperature, all of which affect your ability to exercise.

But does this mean that there is no evidence behind exercising at a specific time?

Morning Exercise: To Do Or Not To Do?

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Morning is the best time to exercise if you have trouble being consistent. According to Cedric Bryant, a chief ‘American Council on Exercise’ science officer, people who exercise in the morning will have developed a regular routine. This is because they can get their physical activity out of the way before the pressures of life take over.

 

When Insomnia Comes To Play, Exercise In The Evening

Insomnia is a monster that can ruin daily routines. As ironic as it may sound, a regular bedtime can help to beat it. This means tiring yourself out before you hit the sack.

However, as shown by Sally A. White, the dean and professor at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, you need to make sure your body is in a ‘rest zone’, or else it will not be ready to sleep. This means that exercising too late can actually work against you.

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If you decide to exercise in the evening, it’s important to try a few yoga moves right after your workout, rather than a full-on cardio workout hours before you sleep. The key is to help your body relax, giving it enough time to regulate its temperature and heart rate before bedtime.

 

A Midday Break

Try exercising in the afternoon, if you have trouble getting out of bed in the morning. It will allow you to get your adrenaline pumping, without having to fight your body at 5 a.m.

If you have a lunch break, why not take 10 minutes and do a few exercises in the corner of a meeting room? It’ll be easier to do, especially if your colleagues get involved and make the habit consistent. Just don’t eat first. There’s no need to make yourself sick!

In the end, developing a habit is the most important thing!…