Top Fitness Myths Busted

Source: curves.com

 

Working out at the gym can be pretty scary when you are surrounded by lean people showing off their muscles and boasting about that certain hack they can swear by. If you are at the gym and you see another person doing something completely different to what you have been told, don’t just follow blindly. They might be doing something that is best for their body, but not for yours.

When it comes to fitness and getting in shape, you are bound to hear things that people live by. What if we told you that most of the hacks are actually myths and people have been doing it for years without any positive outcome? If you need someone to talk to then get in touch with a qualified trainer who can guide you better; unless your concerns are mental… there an online psychologist might be the best option as mentioned here: https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/psychologyists/are-online-psychologists-for-real/. Otherwise, here is a list of fitness myths that we have compiled for you to help with your physical concerns.

 

  1. Spot Reduction

If you are trying to lose weight around your belly then just sit-ups won’t work. If your required area is covered with fat, the muscle won’t show up no matter the exercises. The best way to lose weight around the specific area is by consistently doing cardiovascular exercises along with a healthy diet. Once the fat layers are gone, then certain exercises can start showing muscles.

 

  1. There are three ab layers
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The myth revolving around the infamous 6 pack abs is that you have three layers – lower, upper and middle. However, the truth is that it’s all a single muscle. In order for you to target your ab muscle effectively, you need to pre-exhaust certain parts starting from top to bottom.

 

  1. Deep squats lead to knee pain

Many people say that deep squats aren’t good for your knees. However, there isn’t much truth to it as there isn’t enough evidence. The key is to keep your weight to a minimum, so try touching your heels with your butt while keeping the weight light. If you are using the right technique, this exercise won’t hurt.

 

  1. Deadlift is equal to back problems

You must have heard that certain people hurt their backs while doing a deadlift, but let us tell you that wasn’t because they did a deadlift. The reason behind this problem was compromised technique. Compromising your form may allow you to lift the weight but it messes up your back in the long run. It is better that you use the proper techniques.

 

  1. Heavy protein intake is important after lifting

Unless you are training to be a heavyweight lifter, loading up on proteins right after you lift isn’t going to help you. It’s probably going to hang in there or just sit on your waistline because a human body can only digest up to 15g of protein. The rest is just extra.

 

  1. Your wrists should be bent or cocked back while benching

The truth is that you should bench with your wrists straight. The biggest concern of benching this way is wrist tendonitis. It creates disruption in the proprioceptive system. Although it is difficult at the beginning, with time and practice your wrists get stronger, improving your neurological stiffening patterns.

 

  1. Long runs are for everyone

If you believe that anyone can achieve the long run milestone then you are mistaken. In order for you to run the extra miles, you need to be in running shape. You have to start your way from the ground up, which means starting with a light jog, running and then improving your stamina with time.

 

  1. Stretching decreases injuries
Source: bodybuilding.com

 

This is a common myth that every other person believes. At all cost, you should avoid static stretching before your regular exercise routine. You want your muscles to get active, not lazy. Keep the stretching for later maybe. They are a great way to relax your muscles post-exercise.

These are the most common myths that circulate the fitness world.